Top Navigation

 

Archive | Protein Assays

GETTING E. COLI TO MAKE PROTEIN

A new mechanism by which bacteriophage T5 inhibits growth of E. coli

How can we better control pathogenic bacteria? Insights may come from studying bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria. There are a wide variety of bacteriophages, each of which is specialized to infect and replicate within a specific target bacteria. Learning how a bacteriophage takes over bacterial metabolism to direct resources towards generating more bacteriophage can both […]

Continue Reading
Forest

Deciphering Lipid Metabolism in Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) to Better Understand Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is the most common tick-born disease in the United States, with almost half a million cases diagnosed every year. Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), which is transmitted to humans when they are bitten by an infected tick. Bb does not produce any toxins, and the pathogenesis of Lyme […]

Continue Reading
DNA

Sapphire Biomolecular Imager Used in Landmark Study of DNA Repair Pathway

The non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway is one of two pathways responsible for repairing double-stranded breaks in cellular DNA. Double-stranded breaks can be formed by ionizing radiation or mutagenic chemicals, or as intermediates during normal processes such as the recombination of DNA segments required to create antibody and T cell receptor diversity. In contrast to homologous […]

Continue Reading
Direct Indirect

The evolution of the ELISA and other immunoassays

If you’re reading this blog there’s a high chance that you use antibodies in your work, in some form of immunoassay. However, many of us rarely stop and think about where these antibodies come from and how their development has been fundamental for the evolution of life sciences. A brief history of the antibody Antibodies […]

Continue Reading